Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

1617 Aerial.jpg
  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

1617 C.jpg
1617 D.jpg
1617 Fedit.jpg
  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

1617 N.jpg
  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters  Program  This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.  The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.  The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.  The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.  Solution  The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.  Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.  This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

Program

This custom residence was created out of the basic elements in architecture-light, shadow, massing, color, transition and how we experience these things.

The owner requested one thing; “…create a home that no matter my mood or frame of mind, it makes me forget even my worst day in calming surroundings filled with light”.

The intention was to create a light filled retreat in a tight urban setting.  A residential Light Box.

The residence is located on a narrow urban lot in Chicago's older Bucktown neighborhood. It is for a young urban couple.  The residence faces east and is bound on its north and south by neighboring buildings as close as three feet, rising four stories.  The size of the house was to be approximately 6000 square feet in area and comprise of 4 levels.  Because the residence was to be four stories, the main living level was located on the second floor, taking advantage of the garage roof as exterior urban space.  The first level required an office for the owners, a den, an exercise room and spa bath.  The second floor required a living room, dining room, kitchen and family room.  The third floor was for the bedrooms and an open reading loft.  The fourth floor was for the master bedroom suite, and the roof level was for entertaining, including a full roof deck with views of the city skyline.  The owners also requested a series of exterior spaces located on different levels; courtyard, garage roof deck and house roof deck.

Solution

The design solution started with an urban box and the notion of “light” and how to move light throughout the house.  The box was given carved openings on the ends in addition to a large hidden inner light court that introduces natural sunlight into the center of the residence.

Because the entire residence is conceived of as one solid rectangle, openings in it and carved areas shift its scale, drawing attention to its subtle detail.  Windows for different rooms were grouped to strengthen the shift in scale.  The first floor was also set back, carved and clad in dark masonry to give hierarchy to its upper white masonry clad main levels.  The masonry is carefully articulated in a stacked bond pattern reinforcing the orthogonal nature of the residence.

This residence is designed using very simple strategies.  The exterior is mainly clad in only two materials; white masonry and cedar, with a small amount charcoal masonry used at the first floor base.  The white masonry creates open and light filled interiors while the cedar is used as natural, softening accent.  Both materials extend to the interiors to create subtle contrasting surfaces and blur the boundary between the exterior and the interior.