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  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters   2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit   This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south.   The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.  The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.  Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.  On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit

This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south. 

The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.

The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.

Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.

On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters   2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit   This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south.   The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.  The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.  Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.  On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit

This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south. 

The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.

The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.

Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.

On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

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  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters   2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit   This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south.   The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.  The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.  Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.  On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit

This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south. 

The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.

The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.

Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.

On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

  Single-Family   Location:  Chicago, IL  Photos:  Marty Peters   2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit   This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south.   The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.  The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.  Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.  On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

Single-Family
Location: Chicago, IL
Photos: Marty Peters

2005 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Awards: Citation of Merit

This custom house required special attention to its unusually tight urban property.  The property is approximately 20 percent shorter than a typical Chicago lot.  In addition, the property is bounded by a large multi-family building to the north, a garage tight to the lot line on the east and a noisy public alley to the south. 

The goal was to create an urban retreat that provided privacy, yet was filled with natural light and had an open, spacious environment.

The solution called for breaking up a typical Chicago “box”, with simple yet aesthetically strong compositions-each volume defined by a different material.

Rather than creating a blank wall to the alley, the architect used this façade to define the houses composition and to bring in natural light.  The cubistic volumes also helped obscure the noise (and headlights) from vehicles travelling in the alley.

On the interior, the house is generously lit with an abundance of natural, yet indirect light sources.  It should be noted that only 25 percent of the residences windows provide actual views to the exterior.  The rest are frosted or are placed out of viewing height, either tight to the ceiling or tight to the floor.

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